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1940 1949 1950 1948

Administration proposes legislation to make lynching a federal crime, create a new FEPC, abolish poll taxes in national elections, and end segregation in interstate transportation, but none of the bills are brought to a vote in the Senate.

Ted Poston, one of the few African-American reporters working for a white daily paper, writes about "The Negro Press" in The Reporter.

Living all their lives in a segregated society; ignored, stigmatized, or lampooned in the daily press, Negro Americans have learned that only in their own weekly newspapers can they find a record of their achievements (often overemphasized), a mirror of their emotions, and an expression of their yearnings for full citizenship and dignity. Other papers furnish none of these things. The best chance an ordinary Negro has to get into a white newspaper is by committing a crime.
—"The Negro Press," The Reporter, December 6, 1949